What do I do when I get my ancestry DNA kit?

How do I use my ancestry kit?

Do NOT eat, drink, smoke or chew gum for 30 minutes before giving your saliva sample.

  1. Fill the tube with saliva to the black wavy line. …
  2. Replace the funnel with the cap. …
  3. Tighten to release stabilizing fluid. …
  4. Shake the tube for at least five seconds. …
  5. Place the tube in the collection bag. …
  6. Mail in your sample.

Should I brush my teeth before ancestry DNA?

When collecting your sample, follow these guidelines: Brush your teeth and/or use mouthwash. Don’t eat, drink, smoke, or chew gum or tobacco for 30 minutes after brushing your teeth and before providing your saliva sample. … If you find it hard to produce saliva, place 1/4 teaspoon of white table sugar on your tongue.

How long do I have to use my ancestry DNA kit?

DNA kits can be used for at least one year after the date of purchase, and often longer. If you’ve had a DNA test for more than a year and you haven’t sent in your saliva sample, activate the kit and send in your sample. If the test fails at the lab, we’ll replace your AncestryDNA kit.

Are ancestry DNA kits worth it?

AncestryDNA is a great way to learn about (or confirm) your ancestry. The service is easy to use, with abundant online resources. It’s cost-effective, too. If you’re already an Ancestry member, it’s worth adding AncestryDNA, as it’s a useful tool if you’re in charge of building and updating family trees.

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Can I drink water before DNA test?

Do not eat, drink (even water), smoke or chew gum 30 minutes prior to providing your sample! If we are unable to analyze your first sample, you will be provided with a free replacement kit!

How do you get saliva?

To help produce saliva

On the outside of the mouth, stimulate saliva production by gently rubbing the cheeks behind the back teeth. Any stimulation involving taste, smell, or chewing motions of the jaw will also help to produce more saliva.

Why do ancestry DNA tests fail?

The most common reason is when the tester has a medical issue and cannot produce enough saliva for the “spit test” (which is what Ancestry and 23andMe use). In that case, a “swab test” (FTDNA) will have a better chance of success. It does happen but not very often.

Can a DNA test be inconclusive?

Inconclusive results indicate that DNA testing did not produce information that would allow an individual to be either included or excluded as the source of the biological evidence. Inconclusive results can occur for many reasons.